Middle class tipplers as bad as binge drinkers

November 14th, 2007 - 2:19 am ICT by admin  
In a drive organised by the Department of Health, social drinkers will be warned that more than a glass of winner per day will impair their health, like in the case of young binge drinkers.

“Most of these are not young people, they are ‘everyday’ drinkers who have drunk too much for too long. This has to change,” the Telegraph quoted Dawn Primarolo, the Public Health Minister, as saying.

The research by the North West Public Health Observatory found that people from relatively affluent areas are more likely to cross sensible levels of alcohol consumption than those living in deprived areas.

Consuming 22 units per week will make a man fall into the “hazardous” category, while for women it is 15 units. Some of the country’s most wealthy areas were found to have a concentration of the biggest numbers of “hazardous drinkers”, making Runnymede in Surrey and Harrogate in North Yorkshire land top spots in league tables.

However, the lowest rate was found in relatively deprived Newham, East London, with 14.1 per cent.

“In order to stop further increases in alcohol-related deaths and admission to hospital, we must reverse the tolerance that most communities have built up by simply consuming too much alcohol on a weekly basis,” Professor Mark Bellis, director of the observatory, said.

Karen Tocque, director of science and strategy at the North West Public Health Observatory, said that regular risks are morel likely to be involved in domestic violence.

“Binge drinking has received the most attention because it is connected to violence and anti-social behaviour but those who are drinking regularly are at risk of health problems, domestic violence and behavioural issues,” Tocque said.

The research also showed that harmful drinkers are from deprived areas of the country. Topping the table is Manchester with 8.8 pct of adults and Liverpool follows with 8.1 pct.

Liverpool also has the highest rate per 100,000 for alcohol attributable hospital admissions for men and women.

“Both hazardous and harmful drinking patterns are contributing to increasing alcohol-related ill-health and pressures on health services across the whole country,” the researchers said. (ANI)

Related Stories

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Posted in World |

Subscribe