Americans think healthcare system needs radical overhaul

August 7th, 2008 - 3:37 pm ICT by IANS  


Washington, Aug 7 (IANS) The bulk of Americans, highly dissatisfied with their healthcare system, think that it needs a radical overhaul to provide better services and care to the public, according to a new survey. Released Thursday by the Commonwealth Fund, the survey also outlined what an ideally organised healthcare system would look like, and detailing strategies that could create that organized, efficient system while simultaneously improving care and cutting costs.

The survey of more than 1,000 adults was conducted by Harris Interactive in May 2008; and the vast majority of those surveyed — nine out of ten — felt it was important that the two leading presidential candidates propose reform plans that would improve health care quality, ensure that all Americans can afford health care and insurance, and decrease the number of uninsured.

One in three adults report their doctors ordered a test that had already been done or recommended unnecessary treatment or care in the past two years. Adults across all income groups reported experiencing inefficient care.

And, eight in 10 adults across income groups supported efforts to improve the health system’s performance with respect to access, quality and cost.

“It is clear that our health care system isn’t giving Americans the health care they need and deserve,” said Commonwealth Fund president Karen Davis. “The disorganisation and inefficiency are affecting Americans in their everyday lives, and it’s obvious that people are looking for reform.

“With the upcoming election, there is great opportunity for our leaders to hear what the American people are saying they want from a health care system, and to respond with meaningful proposals.”

The survey, Public Views on U.S. Health Care System Organization: A Call for New Directions, found that, in addition to respondents’ overall dissatisfaction with the health care system, people are frustrated with the way they currently get health care.

In fact, 47 percent of patients experienced poorly coordinated medical care in the past two years — meaning that they were not informed about medical test results or had to call repeatedly to get them, important medical information wasn’t shared between doctors and nurses, or communication between primary care doctors and specialists was poor.

Respondents pointed to the need for a more cohesive care system. Nine of 10 surveyed believe that it is very important or important to have one place or doctor responsible for their primary care and for coordinating all of their care.

Similarly, there was substantial public support for wider adoption of health information technology, like computerized medical records and sharing information electronically with other doctors as a means of improving patient care.

Nine of 10 adults wanted easy access to their own medical records, and thought it was important that all their doctors have such access as well.

Those surveyed also reported problems with access to health care-nearly three out of four had a difficult time getting timely doctors’ appointments, phone advice, or after-hours care without having to go to the emergency room.

Although the uninsured were the most likely to report problems getting timely care without going to the emergency room, 26 percent of adults with health insurance also said it was difficult to get same-or-next-day appointments when they were sick.

And 39 percent of insured adults said it was hard to get through to their doctors on the phone when they needed them.

Some of the recommendations were moving away from traditional fee-for-service payments to a system in which providers and hospitals are paid for high quality, patient-centred, coordinated health care.

Besides, patients should be given incentives to go to the health care professionals and institutions that provide the most efficient, highest quality health care. However, in order for this to work, health care providers and health care systems would need to be evaluated to determine if they are providing high quality, efficient health care and information on performance would need to be publicly available.

Among other recommendations were that regulations should remove barriers that prevent physicians from sharing information that is essential to coordinate care and ensure safe and effective transitions for patients.

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