After 15 years, it is alright to say that yuou are gay in the US armed forces

July 19th, 2008 - 5:49 pm ICT by ANI  

Washington, July 19 (ANI): Fifteen years ago, former U.S.President Bill Clinton’’s administration’’s followed a “don”t ask, don”t tell” policy with regard to the presence of gays in the American armed services. Now, three in four Americans say gay people who are open about their sexual orientation should be allowed to serve in the U.S. military, up from 62 percent in early 2001 and 44 percent in 1993.
According to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll, a majority of Democrats, Republicans and independents now believe it is acceptable for openly gay people to serve in the U.S. armed forces.
In 1993, Clinton faced strong resistance to his campaign pledge to lift the military’’s ban on allowing gay people to enlist. At that time, 67 percent of Republicans and 75 percent of conservatives opposed the idea. A majority of independents, 56 percent, and 45 percent of Democrats also opposed changing the policy.
Today, Americans have become more supportive of allowing openly gay men and women to serve in the armed forces. Support from Republicans has doubled over the past 15 years, from 32 to 64 percent. More than eight in 10 Democrats and more than three-quarters of independents now support the idea, as did nearly two-thirds of self-described conservatives.
In the new Post-ABC poll, military veterans are less apt than others to say gay people should be allowed in the military. While 71 percent of veterans said gay people who do not declare themselves as such should be allowed to serve, that number drops sharply, to 50 percent, for those who are open about their sexuality. Non-veterans, by contrast, are as likely to support those who “tell” as those who do not.
Across all three periodic Post-ABC surveys on the issue, women have been more apt than men to support gays in the military. Today, more than eight in 10 women support allowing openly gay soldiers, compared with nearly two-thirds of men. Fifteen years ago, half of women supported this stance; nearly two-thirds of men opposed it.
The Post-ABC poll was conducted by telephone July 10 to 13, among a random national sample of 1,119 adults. The results have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus three percentage points. Error margins are larger for sub-groups. (ANI)

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