Afghan Government’s ban on revealing wedding outfits outrages public, HR activists

April 2nd, 2011 - 4:35 pm ICT by ANI  

Taliban Kabul, Apr 2 (ANI): The new law proposed by the Afghanistan Government that bans women garments contrary to Islamic sharia has outraged the general public and human right activists.

The Government has planned to close down the shops dealing with outfits that are semi-naked, naked, transparent, or tight in a way that reveals part of the woman’s body.

The new law also bans large parties in the wedding halls. It says that wedding guests will be limited to 300 and selections of food will be regulated by local government officials to ensure no more than 5 dollar is spent per person.

The government is also planning to set up ‘committees’ to monitor weddings.

The groups including representatives of the Religious Affairs Ministry, will be expected to patrol private wedding ceremonies taking place in wedding halls of Kabul, The Guardian reports.

Their duty also includes ensuring male and female guests do not mix in same rooms, which is already a standard practice in most Afghan weddings.

“This is pointless because the mullahs will not be happy unless the women are wearing burqas,” “It is all because of pressure from the Taliban,” said a shopkeeper Muhiuddin Alizada, as he was shocked due to the new restrictions.

Another shopkeeper responded to the new draft law and pointed out that people used to wera similar dresses during Taliban regimes but there were no such ristrictions.

Human rights activists are similarly aghast. Georgette Gagnon, the UN director of human rights in Afghanistan claims that the new law interferes with private family life and could well be inconsistent with sharia principles and the constitution.

With the plans to regulate Aghanistan’s wedding industry, the government claims that the purpose is to curb the country’s mania for lavish weddings that drag people into serious debt. (ANI)

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