Tamil Nadu lawyers ask chief justice to intervene

February 24th, 2009 - 11:57 pm ICT by IANS  

Chennai, Feb 24 (IANS) Tamil Nadu lawyers have sent hundreds of messages to Chief Justice of India K.G. Balakrishnan demanding a probe by a retired judge of the Supreme Court into the lawyers-police clash here, while they also continued to boycott courts and carried on with a relay hunger strike to seek action against the police.
T. Mohan, an activist lawyer, told IANS that the advocates have sent “hundreds of telegrams” to the apex court chief justice.

“The police assaulted lawyers, judges, damaged court property and indulged in criminal intimidation of the judicial system by attacking unarmed lawyers. Unless the commissioner of police (K. Radhakrishnan), director general of police (K.P. Jain) and a host of other officials are suspended and prosecuted, we will not rest,” Mohan added.

The lawyers hardened their stand, ignoring the appeal by state ministers to bury the hatchet. On Feb 19, lawyers protesting against the detention of some of their colleagues clashed with police inside the Madras High Court premises. Lawyers have been on the warpath since then, demanding action against the police.

According to Mohan, the repeated police statements on the issue are “a chimera of lies and worse”.

Meanwhile, head constable Muralidharan told IANS that a police association disbanded in 1980 would be revived soon to “fight for the rights of ordinary police personnel and top officials alike”.

Referring to lawyers’ claims that the police had no right to enter the high court premises, he said: “The police stepped in due to a law and order situation and maintained law and order. There is no section in the criminal procedure code prohibiting the police from entering the premises of the high court.”

“And the government cannot give in to unjustified demands of deploying personnel of the Central Industrial Security Force because courts are not industrial establishments,” he said.

Related Stories

    Posted in Uncategorized |

    Subscribe