India will not withdraw most wanted list: Official

May 20th, 2011 - 2:00 pm ICT by IANS  

New Delhi, May 20 (IANS) There was “no possibility” of India withdrawing the list of its most wanted terrorists in Pakistan, a senior official said Friday, a day after a man on the list was found to be in a Mumbai jail. He also said that the home ministry would conduct an exercise to ensure there were no more errors.

“The MHA (ministry of home affairs) will do an exercise to ensure that there are no other errors,” Secretary (internal security) U.K. Bansal told reporters here after a second error on the most wanted list was exposed.

In reply to a question if India would withdraw the list given to Pakistan in March, he added: “No, there is no possibility.”

Bansal said the “error has already been accepted by CBI (Central Bureau of Investigation)”, referring to the earlier statement by the investigation agency.

“A mistake can always be laid at the door of casual approach. You can always draw your own conclusion,” said Bansal.

The Indian government was left red-faced Thursday when Feroze Abdul Rashid Khan, listed as criminal No.24 in the dossier, was found to be actually in Mumbai’s fortified Arthur Road Central Jail and facing trial in the 1993 serial blasts case.

This is the second goof-up in the list that was given to Pakistan during the home secretary-level talks in March.

Earlier this week, the home ministry had to face huge embarrassment over Wazhul Qamar Khan, who was also alleged to be hiding in Pakistan but was found to be living in Thane near Mumbai.

On Thursday, the CBI, which had forwarded Feroze Khan’s named to the home ministry for the list, had owned up to the mistake.

Out of the 50 names, the National Investigation Agency had forward 10 names and it stands by the list. The CBI is now rechecking the names of 40 people it had given.

The CBI suspended an inspector and transferred two senior officers for the error, said a statement from the agency Thursday.

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