Scientists use X-ray, optical observations to determine power of supernova explosion (re-issue)

March 23rd, 2008 - 4:26 pm ICT by admin  

Washington, March 23 (ANI): Two teams of international researchers have used the techniques of X-ray and optical observations to make the best determination of the power of a supernova explosion, long after it was noticeable from Earth.

The teams say that this novel combination of X-ray and optical observations may help reveal the details of how some stars come to a cataclysmic death.

Using data from NASAs Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Gemini Observatory and ESAs XMM-Newton Observatory, two teams of international researchers, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists Kem Cook and Sergei Nikolaev, determined that a supernova that occurred about 400 years ago was unusually bright and energetic.

The teams used the combination of X-ray and optical images to show the aftermath of a powerful supernova explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small galaxy about 160,000 light years from Earth.

By observing the remains of a supernova and a light echo from the initial explosion, the teams have established the validity of a new method for studying a type of supernova that produces most of the iron in the universe.

The scientists say that this is the first time two methods X-ray observations of the supernova remnant and optical observations of the expanding light echoes have been combined to study a supernova. Until now, scientists could only estimate the power of explosions from the light seen soon after a star exploded, or from remnants that are several hundred years old, but not from both.

The teams say that the results could have implications in identifying similar incidents in the Milky Way.

Classifying outbursts associated with centuries-old remnants is likely to be successful in providing new constraints on additional LMC supernovae as well as their historical counterparts in our own galaxy, Cook said.

In 2004, scientists used Chandra to determine that a supernova remnant, known as SNR 0509-67.5 in the LMC, was a Type Ia supernova, which is caused by a white dwarf star in a binary system that reaches a critical mass and explodes.

In the new optical study, an estimate of the explosions power came from studying the original light of the explosion as it travels through space. Just as sound bounces off walls of a canyon, light waves create an echo by bouncing off dust clouds in space. The light from these echoes travels a longer path than the light that travels straight toward us, and so can be seen hundreds of years after the original explosion.

“People didnt have advanced telescopes to study supernovas when they went off hundreds of years ago,” said Armin Rest of Harvard University, who led the light echo observations.

“But weve done the next best thing by looking around the site of the explosion and constructing an action replay of it, he added.

First seen by the Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, the light echoes were observed in greater detail by Gemini Observatory in Chile. The optical spectra of the light echo were used to confirm the supernova was a Type Ia and to unambiguously determine the particular class of explosion and its energy.

The Chandra and XMM data were then independently used to calculate the amount of energy involved in the original explosion, using analysis of the supernova remnant and state-of-the-art explosion models.

The conclusion was that the explosion was an especially energetic and bright variety of Type Ia supernova, providing strong evidence that the detailed explosion models are accurate.

Cook said that their work is being extended to other supernova remnants and light echoes.

These results appear in two recently accepted papers in The Astrophysical Journal. (ANI)

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