India cannot rely on US to make Pakistan act, say Tharoor and Sibal

December 19th, 2008 - 3:40 pm ICT by ANI  

By Naveen Kapoor
New Delhi, Dec.19 (ANI): Many intellectuals feel that India cannot be too dependent on the United States to make Pakistan take action against the terrorists in that country.

Shashi Tharoor, the former Under Secretary in the United Nations, on Thursday stated that ultimately India would have to attend to its problems on its own. He said: ” No one will do the ultimate job for India”. However Tharoor said that United States, which used the ISI after 1979 when the Soviets occupied Afghanistan , can reach out to the Pakistan Military, as it is has pumped in 11 billion dollars in the last seven years into that country. And, the US is planning to invest in Pakistan millions of dollars more for fighting terrorism. This money is all the more crucial for Pakistani establishment at this crunch time of recession. The US can ask Pakistan to pay back by stopping orchestrating terrorism in India, Tharoor said.

Tharoor, however, said that military strikes against Pakistan were not an option. Former foreign secretary Kanwal Sibal has also criticized the government for what he said depending too much on the US government to pressurize Pakistan after 26/11 Mumbai carnage.

Sibal said: “Our over-reliance on United States is not the right approach. The US establishment is interested is in crisis management. It does not want Mumbai attacks to result in breakdown of dialogue or military action.

That was the reason why a host of US firefighters like the Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Senator John Kerry were flown to New Delhi and Islamabad to douse the crisis between the two nuclear powered neighbors. Sibal pointed out that the United States had greater influence over in Pakistan than we do and they want to de-escalate things. If we expect them to fight our battle, it would be wishful thinking, Sibal said. (ANI)

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