Dalai Lama asks media to be honest, objective and impartial

November 10th, 2008 - 10:07 pm ICT by ANI  

Meerut (U.P.), Nov 10 (ANI): Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama on Monday asked the media to be honest, objective and impartial in their reporting.

Addressing a gathering in Meerut in Uttar Pradesh on today Dalai Lama said that media is the eye of the society and they should point out the mistakes in the society without being biased and unfair.

I always say in order to develop more clean society some mischievous people are always there, so media people should make it clear all this and who are the mischievous people that’’s very very important. Media people should have long nose as long as elephants nose and should smell front and behind and then if something goes wrong must make clear to public whether religious people whether businessman whether politicians or whether leaders that I think is very very important provided you should be very honest and objective and not bias that’’s very important that I always mention, said Dalai Lama.

Meanwhile a Chinese official has said that Dalai Lama’’s calls for “high-level autonomy” for Tibet will never be accepted by Beijing.

Zhu Weiqun, a vice minister of the Chinese Communist Party’’s United Front Work Department, said on Monday that envoys of the Dalai had pressed his long-standing demand for “genuine autonomy” for the mountain region during talks in Beijing last week.

Ahead of an agenda-setting meeting of exiled Tibetan activists, the Dalai’’s representatives gave their Chinese hosts a “Memorandum for all Tibetans to enjoy genuine autonomy”. But Zhu’’s public response was unyielding.

The Dalai Lama fled into exile in 1959 after an abortive uprising against Chinese rule. He has since lived in India, traveling the world to promote his cause, and is still widely revered in his homeland.

He and other critics of China’’s rule say it stifles religious and cultural freedom and promotes development that skews wealth and opportunities away from poor Tibetans while encouraging influxes of Chinese labour from other parts.

The Buddhist leader suggested this month his “middle way” for Tibet short of outright independence was failing, and speculation has grown he wants to step back from day-to-day political leadership after a bout of poor health.

He is not attending the November 17-22 exiles meeting, perhaps a sign he wants to leave this debate to a newer generation.

Some exiled Tibetans believe China will take their demands seriously only if they shift to a more radical position, demanding outright independence. (ANI)

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