Insulin-boosting medication doesn’t cut patients’ heart attack survival rates

November 14th, 2007 - 8:35 am ICT by admin  
The study was conducted at Mayo Clinic in Olmsted County, between 1979 and 2002.It involved 2,732 heart attack patients, with an average age of 70; 56 percent were women. Of the heart attack group, 486 (18 percent) also had diabetes mellitus. The diabetes patients were split into three groups and treated with SU2 drugs, insulin, or diet alone.

The drugs studied are called sulfonylureas and include several commonly used pills to increase insulin release to lower blood sugar. Second-generation sulfonylureas — known collectively as SU2 — include glimepiride (Amaryl), glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL), and glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase, Glynase).(1)

The researchers were the first to use a broad population of community members to extract information about the impact of various diabetes treatments on patients’ health after heart attack.

The study determines the outcome of heart attack in two groups. First among people who had diabetes and second who were not diabetic. In the diabetes group, researchers tracked patient outcome after heart attack in patients taking three different treatment approaches to lowering blood sugar: SU2 drugs, insulin, diet.

With the increasing cases of diabetes mellitus, the docs are now requiring vidence for their treatment recommendations. Worldwide, the number of diabetics is projected to more than double in three decades, from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030.

The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is growing rapidly, and physicians need evidence for their treatment recommendations. Worldwide, the number of diabetics is projected to more than double in three decades, from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030.

Veronique Roger, M.D., M.P.H., the Mayo cardiologist and epidemiologist who led the study, said that the data had shown that the concern was unfounded.

“These data do not support the concern among some physicians of an adverse impact of SU2 on survival after a heart attack,” she said.

“These results provide clinical guidance for physicians faced with managing a growing number of diabetic patients. Our study is also important because it underscores the potential role of community-based studies for helping provide evidence to clarify treatment strategies and improve care of patients,” she added.

The study was presented on November 6 at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2007 in Orlando, Fla.(ANI)

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