Restless frothing of the Sun’s surface named top space story of 2007

December 26th, 2007 - 4:07 pm ICT by admin  


London, December 26 (ANI): A news item about a Japanese space telescope called Hinode, which revealed the restless bubbling and frothing of the Sun’s surface in astonishing detail, has been named the topmost space story of the year, according to New Scientist magazine.

Scientists said that the observatory would help advance understanding of the Sun in the same manner as the Hubble Space Telescope has helped change views about the universe beyond.

Second on the list of top space stories of the year was an article about strange Martian caves on Mars. The story revealed that an extremely dark feature on Mars was found to be just a pit, and not the entrance to a deep cavern that future astronauts could call home.

A study that suggested that the objects thought to be black holes could instead be wormholes leading to exotic cosmic locales made the third top story, while a Mars probe that was believed to have spotted a lost rover came in fourth.

Wrapping up the top five was news about a satellite pair called GRACE that revealed why Canada has low gravity.

Top 10 space stories of 2007:

1. Dazzling new images reveal the ‘impossible’ on the Sun

Japan’s Hinode telescope revealed the restless frothing of the Sun’s surface in astonishing detail.

2. Strange Martian feature not a ‘bottomless’ cave after all

An extremely dark feature on Mars was found to be just a pit, not the entrance to a deep cavern that future astronauts could call home.

3. Could black holes be portals to other universes?

A study suggested that the objects thought to be black holes could instead be wormholes leading to exotic cosmic locales.

4. Mars probe may have spotted lost rover

In 1997, NASA lost contact with its Pathfinder lander and tiny Sojourner rover, but a decade later, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s eagle eyes spied them both.

5. Satellites solve mystery of low gravity over Canada

A satellite pair called GRACE answered a weighty question: why does Canada have such low gravity?

6. Do black holes really exist?

A controversial study suggested that matter might never collapse completely into a black hole, an idea that would solve a troubling quantum paradox.

7. Satellite snaps first images of mysterious glowing clouds

NASA’s new AIM satellite took its first data on silvery blue ‘noctilucent’ clouds, which may be linked to global warming.

8. Strange alien world made of ‘hot ice’

The smallest planet known to pass in front of its host star was found. Intriguingly, it may be made of exotic hot ice and shrouded in steam.

9. Satellite could see shadow of extra dimensions

Researchers calculated if our 3D universe is floating in a higher dimensional space, the shape of those extra dimensions might be detectable by Europe’s Planck satellite, set to launch in 2008.

10. Atom smasher may give birth to ‘Black Saturns’

Physicists said tiny, ringed black holes resembling Saturn might be produced at the Large Hadron Collider, set to open in 2008. (ANI)

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