Novel urine test detects cause of kidney transplant failure

January 22nd, 2009 - 11:51 am ICT by ANI  

Washington, Jan 22 (ANI): A new and simple urine test that can detect a common cause of kidney transplant failure has been developed.

The novel test may help lead to better diagnosis and treatment of patients with polyomavirus nephropathy, which affects about 9 percent of kidney transplant patients.

The study has been published in the February 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN).

While polyomaviruses are normally occurring viruses that harmlessly infect many adults, they can pose serious health problems for individuals who become immunocompromised. Such is the case for many kidney transplant recipients who must take immunosuppressive medications to safeguard against organ rejection.

Some of these patients develop a damaging condition called polyomavirus nephropathy that can lead to chronic kidney failure and the need to re-initiate dialysis or undergo another transplant.

Because there are no effective therapies to treat polyomavirus nephropathy, it is important to diagnose the condition as early as possible, before it becomes serious.

Now Volker Nickeleit, MD, of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and his colleagues have discovered a new and noninvasive way to test for the condition.

The test measures “Haufen”a German term meaning stack or pilein the urine. Haufen are tightly clustered viral aggregates that form within the kidneys in patients with polyomavirus nephropathy and are excreted in the urine. Testing for Haufen is fast (three hours), inexpensive, and easy to perform with current laboratory equipment.

Through their investigation, the researchers found Haufen in urine samples from all 21 patients with early or late stages of polyomavirus nephropathy, but not in any of the 139 individuals without the condition.

According to Dr. Nickeleit, the new test could help physicians identify and monitor patients with polyomavirus nephropathy and could guide them as they design new therapeutic strategies.

“An early and accurate diagnosis of polyomavirus nephropathy will result in a better understanding of the disease and ultimately improve treatment,” he said.

“Our diagnostic test is unique and could have a tremendous clinical impact,” he added. (ANI)

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