Supermarket shopping bags are the latest status symbol!

November 14th, 2007 - 1:59 am ICT by admin  
According to a survey carried out by food firm Ginsters, 56 per cent of Britons feel that their choice of supermarket gives a clear indication of their social standing.

The survey has shown that one in eight people believe shopping at supermarkets reflects their place on the social ladder.

As a result, the average Briton spends an extra 260 pounds a year by shopping at an uptown supermarket.

One out of ten people asserted that they feel embarrassed if spotted in a supermarket that has a downmarket image.

The firm claimed that many people considered the supermarket as a higher status symbol than their education.

Similar is the case with parading shopping bags; almost half of the 1,631 people surveyed thought that the right carrier bag was more important than a fashionable handbag.

“According to our study, the carrier bag is the accessory of 2007,” the Daily Mail quoted Larry File, marketing controller for Ginsters, as saying.

“Among the fashionable crowd, you need to be seen with the right supermarket bag to make an impression.

“In fact, a proportion of consumers felt that people would pay more attention to their shopping bag than to the design of their handbag.

“Knowing this might have saved someone like Victoria Beckham a small fortune,” he added.

Peter Jackson, professor of human geography at Sheffield University, said, “People will often say they go to a supermarket for convenience or value.

“But really what they are looking for is somewhere that is full of, as they put it, ‘nice people like me’,” he added.

Professor Clifford Guy, a retail development expert from Cardiff University, said, “This kind of snobbery undoubtedly exists but the distinctions are being blurred.

“Aldi, for example, has done well recently because it has a new wine buyer and is attracting customers from the more upmarket stores,” he added. (ANI)

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