I prefer cinema to theatre any day: Anurag Kashyap

April 14th, 2009 - 11:17 am ICT by IANS  

John Abraham By Madhusree Chatterjee
New Delhi, April 14 (IANS) Filmmaker Anurag Kashyap may have produced the play “The Skeleton Woman” featuring his real-life partner Kalki Koechlin, but he maintains that he prefers cinema as a medium to express his emotions.

“I prefer cinema any day to theatre. When I was acting on stage, I loved the stage. But now I would choose filmmaking,” Kashyap, who was groomed on the capital’s experimental stage, told IANS.

“The idea of creating something - showing off, reaching out to an audience, trying to find a voice on a platform that exists - somewhere deep down is a big therapy. All my films are let-outs - either of my anger or my points of view,” he added.

Speaking about the play “The Skeleton Woman”, directed by Nayantara Kotian and written by Kalki, Kashyap said it was based on a Inuit folk tale about a woman and her husband, “Women, Who run with the Wolves” by Clarissa Pinkola Estes.

“Kalki and Prashant (Prakash) wrote it together. I had given her the story while she was auditioning for ‘Dev D’ and it stayed in her head. And when Prashant and Kalki wrote it and won the Hindu-Metro playwright competition, I decided to produce it. The fact that we live together also helped,” said Kashyap who is fond of experimental plays.

“I loved working for ‘Samrangan’ and ‘Sir Sir Sarla’ (starring Sonali Kulkarni) by Makrand Deshpande - both were experimental plays. ‘Samrangam’ was all about physical acting,” he said.

Kashyap, who released “Dev D”, a contemporary interpretation of Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay’s classic “Devdas”, starring Abhay Deol, Mahi Gill and Kalki, is working on two movies.

“I’m producing ‘Udaan’, a movie scripted by Vikramditya Motwani (the scriptwriter of ‘Dev D’). It is a story about a father and son, set in a small suburban town Jamshedpur. We will start pre-production shooting in July,” he said.

For his second film “Bombay Velvet”, Kashyap has teamed up with John Abraham and Naseeruddin Shah.

Kashyap likes movies by Martin Scorsese, David Fincher and Danny Boyle. However, his scripts are inspired by modern American playwright Edward Albee.

“I’m hundred percent influenced by Albee in my style of dialogues and filmmaking, though the irreverence of Harold Pinter creeps into my work at times,” said Kashyap, who is known for his flair for words and written narratives.

The director, who studied Zoology at Hansraj College, is indebted to Delhi, the city which spurred him into showbiz.

“My old friend Suneet Kumar (of the Delhi-based theatre troupe, Actor Factor) introduced me to theatre and classical cinema in Delhi. I joined the Jan Natya Manch in 1992 and started writing my own experimental plays. Suneet preserved all my plays, some of which even I had forgotten - and later improvised on them,” he said.

Kashyap loves acting on stage but not in films.

“I loved acting on the stage, but I don’t like the idea of acting on screen. I don’t have the patience to shoot on film sets. It is easy to get into the character on stage. So I keep writing movie scripts and doing other things for cinema,” he said.

Kashyap plans to produce for three years before making something that is entirely his own.

He shot to fame with the screenplay of Ram Gopal Varma’s “Satya” and followed it up with contemporary Bollywood classics like “Black Friday”, which he directed, and “Water” - for which he wrote the script.

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